Nursing jobs: What to ask in your interview

It is important to remember that an interview is not just for the employer. It is also your chance to find out about the role and the company and decide on how well the job suits you.

You’ve answered all that they have to ask you and now it is your chance to find out more, but what questions will impress your employer and what should you avoid?

To impress

  • What would constitute a typical day/week in this role?- It is very important that you are as prepared as possible for when you start and this will help you understand what tasks you will be dealing with on a regular basis.
  • What are the prospects for growth and advancement?- Ambition and a willingness to prove yourself indicates that you will be a hard worker.
  • Is it possible to have a look around the unit?- Showing an interest in your environment indicates confidence and capability.
  • How many staff/patients are there?- Wanting to know more about both the team and how busy things will be shows a strong tendency for forward planning.
  • Is overtime expected?- Showing that you are aware of the demands of the role and the need for overtime will help you come across as knowledgeable about the position.
  • Do you have a preceptorship scheme?- These can be invaluable for a newly qualified nurse.
  • How does the service gather patient feedback?- Showing a willingness to improve shows them that you are able to take both positive and negative feedback in a professional manner.

If you find it difficult to remember all of these, it will not do you any harm in writing them down and pulling the list out in the interview. It can even make you look more prepared.

To avoid

  • What sort of ward is this?- Asking broad questions will only tell the employer that you have not done your research.
  • When will I be able to take annual leave?- It does not leave a good impression when you are asking about time to be taken off before the role even begins.
  • Did I get the job?- Unfortunately the employer genuinely won’t know the answer until they have interviewed everyone. Asking at the time will not really tell you anything.

It is important not to make the interviewer unnecessarily repeat themselves. It can be highly detrimental if they think that you have not been listening to what they have been saying.

To finish

  • If I were offered the position, when would I be able to start?- Enthusiasm to begin straight away always goes down well with the employer.
  • When can I expect to hear from you?
  • Are there any other questions I can answer for you?- Come across as open and approachable and you will find that they are that much more inclined in your favour.

Most importantly of all, remember to smile, thank them for their time and let them know that it has been a pleasure. Well done!

It is important to remember that an interview is not just for the employer. It is also your chance to find out about the role and the company and decide on how well the job suits you.

You’ve answered all that they have to ask you and now it is your chance to find out more, but what questions will impress your employer and what should you avoid?

To impress

  • What would constitute a typical day/week in this role?- It is very important that you are as prepared as possible for when you start and this will help you understand what tasks you will be dealing with on a regular basis.
  • What are the prospects for growth and advancement?- Ambition and a willingness to prove yourself indicates that you will be a hard worker.
  • Is it possible to have a look around the unit?- Showing an interest in your environment indicates confidence and capability.
  • How many staff/patients are there?- Wanting to know more about both the team and how busy things will be shows a strong tendency for forward planning.
  • Is overtime expected?- Showing that you are aware of the demands of the role and the need for overtime will help you come across as knowledgeable about the position.
  • Do you have a preceptorship scheme?- These can be invaluable for a newly qualified nurse.
  • How does the service gather patient feedback?- Showing a willingness to improve shows them that you are able to take both positive and negative feedback in a professional manner.

If you find it difficult to remember all of these, it will not do you any harm in writing them down and pulling the list out in the interview. It can even make you look more prepared.

To avoid

  • What sort of ward is this?- Asking broad questions will only tell the employer that you have not done your research.
  • When will I be able to take annual leave?- It does not leave a good impression when you are asking about time to be taken off before the role even begins.
  • Did I get the job?- Unfortunately the employer genuinely won’t know the answer until they have interviewed everyone. Asking at the time will not really tell you anything.

It is important not to make the interviewer unnecessarily repeat themselves. It can be highly detrimental if they think that you have not been listening to what they have been saying.

To finish

  • If I were offered the position, when would I be able to start?- Enthusiasm to begin straight away always goes down well with the employer.
  • When can I expect to hear from you?
  • Are there any other questions I can answer for you?- Come across as open and approachable and you will find that they are that much more inclined in your favour.

Most importantly of all, remember to smile, thank them for their time and let them know that it has been a pleasure. Well done!

Did this help with your preparation? Let us know your thoughts and feedback at #NTCareers

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